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Curlew Profiles

Meet the flock:

Click on the tabs below to read a little bit about each of our birds

Currently Tracking

  • FrankAJJBillThor
    CanyonLadyZarapitaET

    KaseyZeusCurlyMore profile photos coming soon

  • Frank

    Alpha Flag Code:
    AA
    Capture date: 5-2-14
    Sex: Male
    Location: The Long-billed Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) between Middleton and Emmett Idaho.
    Namesake: Frank and his mate Bethine (2014 to 2017) are named after Frank and Bethine Church. The Church’s are a famous couple in Idaho, known for their work in conservation of Idaho’s wild places. In fact, one of the largest wilderness areas in the lower 48 shares their name: The Frank Church river of no return wilderness!

    You can read more about Frank and Bethine on Stephanie Coates’ Curlew Crew blog here.

    Frank receives his transmitter. Photo by Liz Urban

    Frank receives his transmitter. Photo by Liz Urban

     

  • A.J. and Bill Longington

    Alpha Flag Codes:
    AJ   CL
    Capture dates: A.J.  5-27-14, Bill  5-31-15
    Sex: Mated Pair. A.J. is the female, Bill is the male.
    Location: National Elk Refuge in Jackson, WY

    Namesake:
    A.J. is named after AJ DeRosa, a local businessman and boat guide in Wyoming. He is an outdoor adventurer and supporter of conservation in the area. For the past 4 years he has donated boats and guides for the Nature Mapping Jackson Hole project. “The Snake River Float Project is designed to gain a better idea of what species of mammals, birds, and amphibians use the section of river between Wilson Bridge and South Park. In this section, the river flows mostly through private land where wildlife professionals do not conduct a systematic census. In two seasons, the Snake River Float project provided a more complete picture of the species that use the river corridor between Wilson Bridge and South Park. We have also recorded the locations of nests of osprey, bald eagle, and great blue heron, along with ducks and shorebird nesting areas. In its first two years the project recorded nearly 3600 individual birds. Mammals observed range from least chipmunk to moose.”

    Susan Patla from the National Elk Refuge already had plans to name this bird “A.J.” before we even arrived to trap. Coincidentally, as we were looking through possible letter combinations to give her, we realized that we had an alpha flag with those letters!

    AJ

    Jay holds A.J. after attaching her transmitter at the beautiful National Elk Refuge

    Bill was the winning name selected in a student naming contest. Names in this contest were submitted by all the classes that are involved in our Curlews in the Classroom program. Students at Lake Hazel and Pepper Ridge Elementary schools both suggested the names “Bill” and “Bill Longington”, respectively. Great minds think alike!

    We returned to the Elk Refuge in 2015 and were happy to see A.J. was paired up and had an active nest. Because of her transmitter it was easy for us to find her nest and then catch her mate, Bill.

    Bill gets ready for takeoff as he is set free by Emmie Gocke, 16 , of Jackson, WY

  • Thor

    Alpha Flag Codes:
    EM
    Capture dates: 5-4-15
    Sex: Male
    Location: The Long-billed Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) between Middleton and Emmett Idaho.
    Namesake: Thor and his mate of two years, Valkyrie, were named by Middleton High School Students after the biology classes held a naming contest. The names Thor and Valkyrie were chosen since the Middleton High School mascot is the Viking. In Norse mythology, Thor is the god of thunder and Valkyrie is an angel.

    Read about Thor and Valkyrie in this blog post: The curlew of thunder, spit swabs, and bendy beaks

    Thor and Valkyrie were proud parents in 2015. Here's a shot of their newly hatched chick and pipping eggs! Photo by Stephanie Coates

    Thor and Valkyrie were proud parents in 2015. Here’s a shot of their newly hatched chick and pipping eggs! Photo by Stephanie Coates

  • Canyon

    Alpha Flag Code:
    ep
    Capture Date: 5-8-15
    Sex: male
    Location: The Long-billed Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) between Middleton and Emmett Idaho.
    Namesake: Canyon is named after Canyon County, Idaho by students from Emmett High School.

    EP and BSU Grad Student, Stephanie Coates

    Canyon and BSU Grad Student, Stephanie Coates

  • Lady

    Alpha Flag Code:
    CY
    Capture date: 5-25-15
    Sex: Female
    Location: Polecat Bench near Cody, Wyoming
    Namesake: “Lady” or “Lady Susan” is named for Susan Ahalt (aka the Bird Lady) owner of Iron Side Bird Rescue in Cody, WY. She started 28 years ago rescuing a baby starling in her chimney. She has primarily rehabilitated birds in the the Bighorn Basin WY, Powder River Basin WY, and Southern MT.

    Curlew Technician, Eric, gets ready to release Lady

    Curlew Technician, Eric, gets ready to release Lady

  • Zarapita

    Alpha Flag Code:
    CN
    Capture date: 5-26-15
    Sex: Female
    Location: Heart Mountain near Cody, Wyoming
    Namesake: Zarapito is the spanish word for curlew. Since many of our curlews, including Zarapita, winter in Mexico we thought this would be the perfect name for her!

    CN just before being released on the beautiful Heart Mountain Ranch

    Zarapita just before being released on the beautiful Heart Mountain Ranch

  • E.T.

    Alpha Flag Code:
    ET
    Capture date: 6-3-15
    Sex: Female
    Location: Pinedale, WY
    Namesake: E.T. leg flag initials are so cool that they stuck! She’s named after the famous alien, ET…although we think she’s much cuter than her namesake.

    Sue Briggs Stanfill, landowner for the ranch near Pinedale where ET nested, holds ET just before being released.

  • Kasey

    Alpha Flag Code:
    KC
    Capture date: 6-3-15
    Sex: Female
    Location: Daniel, Wyoming
    Namesake: Kasey’s leg flag initials were so cool that they stuck! Incidentally, Kasey is an Irish name that can mean observant, brave, alert, and vigilant…all fitting adjectives for this curlew mom.

    Susan Patla, Nongame Biologist for Wyoming Game and Fish Department gets ready to release KC

    Susan Patla, Nongame Biologist for Wyoming Game and Fish Department and major curlew project supporter gets ready to release Kasey.

  • Zeus

    Alpha Flag Code:
    KA
    Capture date:  5-5-16
    Sex: male
    Location: Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Combat Training Center, south of the Boise Airport
    Namesake: Zeus and his mate Athena nested together in 2016 and 2017. They are named after Greek gods! Their names were entered into our Curlews in the Classroom naming contest by Middleton Middle School’s 7th grade science class, and won 40% of the final vote in our IBO Curlew Crew Facebook naming contest.

    KA holds the record for the shortest bill of any of our transmittered curlews...only 106mm (4 inches)!

    Zeus holds the honor of having one of the shortest bills among our transmittered curlews…only 106mm (4 inches)!

  • Lazara

    Alpha Flag Code:
    HX
    Capture date: Spring 2016
    RECAPTURE DATE: May 25, 2017
    Sex: Female
    Location: The Nature Conservancy’s Flat Ranch Preserve near Island Park, ID

    Namesake: The IBO Curlew Crew and folks from The Flat Ranch Preserve named her Lazara, after the biblical Lazarus, because of her mysterious reappearance in 2017.

    “Will the real Henrietta please stand up??”  

    Biologists arrived one crisp morning in May on The Nature Conservancy’s  Flat Ranch in eastern ID in hopes to find Henrietta, a female curlew we transmittered in 2014. After gaining 3 years of valuable data from her transmitter, we wanted to trap her once more, take OFF the transmitter and give her a huge thank you for being an ambassador for her species. After discovering a female wearing a transmitter on a nest in the same area Henrietta was seen in the night before, we headed towards her with intense anticipation. Once the curlew was trapped and taken from the net- our anticipation turned to complete surprise! It was not Henrietta that we had taken out of the net, it was leg flag ‘HX’- a bird that we had placed a transmitter on in 2016!

    four biologists gather around and work to attach a transmitter to a long billed curlew

    Robin Anderson, Matthew Ward, Stephanie Coates, and Jay Carlisle give Lazara a replacement transmitter in 2017. Photo by Heather Hayes

    Lazara’s transmitter stopped sending signals just months after being placed on the bird and we feared the worst. Not only were we ecstatic to know that she was indeed alive, but then we were able to replace her faulty transmitter and send her on her way!

    But WAIT! What about the “real” Henrietta? Were we able to trap her to take off the transmitter? Scroll down to the “retired” curlew section to read Henrietta’s story.

  • JX

    Alpha Flag Code:
    JX
    Capture date: May, 31, 2018
    Sex: Male
    Location: Grand Teton National Park, WY
    Namesake: We’ll give JX a real name soon. For now his “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag he wears. We gave him the leg flag JX because he lives near Jackson, WY.

    It takes a village to catch a curlew! Our partner biologists with the National Park Service in Grand Teton work with The Curlew Crew to release JX. Photo credit Gia Habetz

    Grand Teton National Park (GTNP) was established in 1929 by the signing of a bill by President Calvin Coolidge in 1929. The park was a 96,000-acre tract of land that include the breathtaking Teton mountain range as well as six glacial lakes in NW Wyoming. Today, the park has grown to 310,000-acres and provides rich grassland habitat for breeding Long-billed curlews like this male, JX. Our partnership with the GTNP and National Park Service has provided us with even more opportunities to study the breeding habitat requirements of curlews.

    Interesting JX fact- this guy was missing the tip of his lower mandible (just visible in photo below), but was observed foraging without issue and was a fierce defender of his nest when ravens would enter his territory!

    JX’s broken lower bill didn’t stop him from protecting his nest! Photo by Gia Habetz

  • JN

    Alpha Flag Code:
    JN
    Capture date: May 27, 2017
    Sex: Male
    Location: Heart Mountain, WY

    Namesake: We’ll give JN a real name soon. For now his “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag he wears.

    Field work is a labor of love, especially for those who study the Long-billed curlew! Most mornings we are up long before sunrise (even before the early-birds getting the worm!) and out past sunset. Spring weather can be inhospitable at times, bringing driving rain, blowing snow, gale force winds…did I mention blowing snow?

    Ben West works hard to survey for curlews in the Wyoming snow! Photo by James Laux

    So when Mother Nature graces us with a beautiful day- it is never taken for granted! And what a great day it was when we met JN- blue skies and lots of smiles and happiness from everyone involved. It even looks like this curlew was smiling as he flew away, but probably for different reasons than the weather ;)

    The Thompson Family helps release JN (Katherine works for our partners at The Nature Conservancy) Photo by Mark Davis.

  • JT

    Alpha Flag Code:
    JT
    Capture date: May 26, 2017
    Sex: Female
    Location: Heart Mountain, WY
    Namesake: We’ll give JT a real name soon. For now her “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag she wears.

    Jay works with Fernando (a Brazilian PhD student at U of WY) to release JT, with scenic Heart Mountain in the background. Photo by Stephanie Coates

    Curlew research has taken biologists to some pretty amazing areas throughout the Intermountain West, and our curlew JT happens to live in one of those places- Heart Mountain, Wyoming. This spectacular geological wonder, called the Heart Mountain Detachment, is the product of the world’s largest terrestrial landslide occurring roughly 49 million years ago! It rises 8,123 feet from the floor of the Bighorn Basin creating a beautiful backdrop for JT’s release (above).

    JT gets weighed before she is released back to her nest near Heart Mountain. Photo by Mark Davis of the Powell Tribune

  • 58

    Aluminum Band:
    gray rectangle with numbers 58
    Capture date: June 1, 2017
    Sex: Male
    Location: Horse Creek, WY

    Namesake: For now, we call him “58” because these are the last two digits of his band number. Unlike most curlews, 58 doesn’t have a green leg flag because his leg was too skinny to fit the size flags we had!

    Male curlews are smaller than females, and this guy had such skinny legs that we didn’t have a leg flag that would fit him! Photo of Madeline Voshell with “58”

    Female curlews typically lay a clutch of 3-4 eggs, but this Wyoming male’s over-achieving mate laid 5! Incubation duty is shared by both parents- the females will incubate all throughout the day, and the males will sit with them all night. These eggs will be on the ground for 28-30 days, so they need round-the-clock-protection!

    Freshly-hatched chick number 1 waits for its four other siblings to hatch. Look closely for chick number 2’s bill sticking from the egg! Photo by Madeline Voshell

  • JE

    Alpha Flag Code:
    JE
    Capture date: May 9, 2017
    Sex: Male
    Location: near MPG Ranch Florence, MT

    Namesake: We’ll give JE a real name soon. For now his “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag he wears. Because of his tiny bill and tough attitude, he earned the nickname “Napoleon” from the curlew crew.

    Though this male, JE,  had broken the record for shortest curlew bill (just a little over 4 inches), he was quite the tough guy! He was super wiggly and acted fierce by trying to “bite” us, which for a curlew, equates to nothing more than little soft nibbles on your hand that feel more like a tickle!! We didn’t have the heart to tell him that, though :)

    a biologist holds a long billed curlew with a green leg flag

    JE shows off his short bill and poses for his profile picture before being released back to his nesting territory in the Bitterroot Valley

    Did you know that a curlew’s bill can tell us A LOT of information? For one, we can tell the size of the bird by measuring it,  like when you go for a check-up and the doctor measures your height. The longer the bill, the “bigger” the curlew. The length of bill also gives us a clue if it is a male or a female.

    We can also gain valuable information from INSIDE a curlew’s bill. By gently swabbing the inside of the bill, we can collect skin cells that reveal important genetic information that can help us determine the health of the population. We discovered through this process that curlews might actually be ticklish!! Want to know why? Check out this Curlew Crew video – Long-billed Curlew bill bending and watch what happens to the end of this curlews bill when we swab their mouth for DNA!

  • CH

    Alpha Flag Code:
    CH
    Capture date: May 8, 2017
    Sex: Female
    Location: near MPG Ranch Florence, MT

    Namesake: We’ll give CH a real name soon. But while we were banding her, the team nicknamed her “Biker Babe” because she was so feisty!

    This female was the first curlew trapped in 2017 for Montana on a state land parcel south of MPG. She used her camouflage to her advantage making her quite the challenge to locate as she sat super tight to the nest. This means that the closer we approached, the lower she sank into the ground making her almost impossible to see!  Most curlews hold very still while they receive their transmitter, but after successfully trapping her, she let us know how impatient she was to get back to her eggs during her processing by continuously pedaling her legs, like she was riding a bicycle!

    two biologists hold a long billed curlew with a transmitter on her back

    Heidi and Jay work to attach CH’s transmitter

    a biologist holding a long billed curlew

    CH the curlew poses for her profile photo near Florence, MT

  • JP

    Alpha Flag Code:
    JP
    Capture date: May 9, 2017
    Sex: Male
    Location: near MPG Ranch, Florence, MT
    Namesake: We’ll give JP a real name soon. For now his “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag he wears. JP shares his initials with IBO research biologist Jessica Pollock!

    a father and daughter let a curlew go, the curlews wings are spread in flight

    IBO Biologist Christian Meny and daughter Cadence release JP back to his nest. Photo by Jay Carlisle

    JP’s breeding grounds are located near the beautiful MPG Ranch in western Montana. This conservation area consists of more than 15,000 acres of undeveloped landscape where scientists specialize in restoration and ecology research. Through this collaboration, we have had the amazing opportunity to learn more about the Long-billed curlews that live at MPG and the surrounding private lands that have very little human impact. Thanks to JP and his new transmitter, we can now track his migration from MPG ranch, to his wintering grounds in Chihuahua, Mexico!

  • JY

    Alpha Flag Code:
    JY
    Capture date: May 8, 2017
    Sex: Female
    Location: near MPG Ranch, Florence, MT

    Namesake: We’ll give JY a real name soon. For now her “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag she wears. While banding her and observing her nest, we gave her the nickname “Mrs. Robinson” after the Simon and Garfunkel song.

    Local landowner and Curlew Neighbor, Susan Nelson, had the chance to come with us when we tagged JY, one of the birds that calls this beautiful valley home.

    We strive to bring curlew education and outreach to local communities whenever possible. Whether it is through our K-12 Curlews In the Classroom programming, inviting landowners with nesting curlews on their property to watch biologists in action, or a visit to our research banding stations, we are extremely passionate about providing hands-on experiences that connect people with nature on a deeper level.

    Landowner, Susan Nelson, and Jay release JY. Photo by Heidi Ware

  • HA

    Alpha Flag Code:
    HA
    Capture date: May 31, 2017
    Sex: Female
    Location:  National Elk Refuge in Jackson, WY
    Namesake: We’ll give HA a real name soon. For now her “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag she wears.

    Many  times curlews can lead technicians on wild “curlew” chase. One minute they look like they will lead you straight to a nest, the next minute, they take flight over the mountains! This female took her sweet time (over 2 hours!!) before finally sitting on her eggs.  With a lot patience, determination and a little bit of luck, this beautiful girl was safely trapped, transmittered and released back into the wild. 

    Madie holds HA on the National Elk Refuge. Photo by Ben West

    a curlew flies away with the snowy Grand Teton mountains in the background

    HA returns to her nest on the scenic National Elk Refuge wearing her shiny new transmitter. Photo by Madeline Voshell

  • 61

    Aluminum Band:
    gray rectangle with white numbers 61
    Capture date: June 2, 2017
    Sex: Male
    Location: New Fork, WY

    Namesake: For now, we call him “61” because these are the last two digits of his band number. Unlike most curlews, 61 doesn’t have a green leg flag because his leg was too skinny to fit the size flags we had!

    61 poses for his profile photo

    When it comes to defense, the Long-billed curlews lack the more common physical characteristics one may think necessary to defend their territory and nest. They don’t use their long slender bill for defense, because if it breaks, they will no longer be able to eat. Also, they don’t have talons like a raptor (in fact they have feet like a chicken!). But what they lack in physical features, they make up with an incredibly loud, shrill alarm call as they “mob” -or dive bomb- anyone or anything that gets too close to their nest!  From egg, to chick, to adult, all curlews are extremely camouflaged, so you may never know that you are too close to a chick or nest. Just take a look at this camouflaged chick in the picture below!

    When you see a defensive curlew, it’s likely that a well-camouflaged chick is hiding nearby. Watch your step and move away if you ever encounter an angry curlew. Photo by Heather Hayes

    Once the other neighboring curlews hear an alarm, guess what?? They ALL come to help defend that one nest and chase the predator or people away! If you think that a few angry curlews are loud, can you imagine what 20 mobbing curlews sounds like?! SO if you ever find yourself being mobbed by curlews, remember- they won’t physically hurt you! To get the mobbing to stop, there is a simple solution- JUST WALK AWAY! Once you are a few hundred yards away, the angry parents and neighboring curlews will leave you alone and head back to their nests.

    We feel that if more people understood this aggressive defense behavior, fewer of these birds would be getting shot. So help us be ambassadors for this declining and protected species by joining us in raising awareness about curlew behavior!

    Check out this IBO Curlew Crew video – Long-billed Curlews mobbing of a curlew fiercely defending its chicks here! (Video Credit- Erica Gaeta)

  • HN

    Alpha Flag Code:
    HN
    Capture date: June 2, 2017
    Sex: Female
    Location: New Fork, Wyoming

    Namesake: We’ll give HN a real name soon. For now her “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag she wears.

    When handling a Long-billed curlew like this female, it is crucial to do everything we can to keep their stress levels at an absolute minimum. This means making sure they are as comfortable as possible while in our care and of course after release.  Some of the techniques we use to ensure the safe handling of the birds includes a soft sock and a tent. YUP! We oftentimes place a soft hood over their head to keep them calm during processing.

    a biologist holding a long billed curlew with a hood over its head

    Like a horse with ‘blinders’, HN wears a hood to keep her calm while she gets her transmitter

    Here, you can see Jay carefully walking with our “hooded” girl heading towards a tent where he will release her inside for a “walk-test” with her transmitter on. When she sat down, we knew she didn’t like the fit of her new backpack and the transmitter needed to be readjusted. When we put her back in the tent for another walk-test after refitting the transmitter, she ran around like crazy, so she got the “green-light” for release!

  • JU

    Alpha Flag Code:
    JU
    Capture date: May 27, 2017
    Sex: Female
    Location: Polecat, WY
    Namesake: We’ll give JU a real name soon. For now her “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag she wears.

    a biologist holds a long billed curlew

    Jay looks down and decides he really needs to do laundry after JU left him a nice parting gift on his shoes and pants!

    Curlews hold in their poop for most of the day while on the nest. Sometimes while we’re tagging them they decide to not hold it any more!

    This female curlew was quite rambunctious while banding, and the Curlew Crew biologists figured that she would take off in a flash and fly right back to the nest when they were done, but surprisingly, she did not! Each time they checked, she was strolling around while the male was incubating the eggs. Just a little later that season, we checked  her transmitter locations on the map and found that her migration route took her right down to Guadalajara, Mexico- the farthest south of any curlews we have tracked!!

  • JV

    Alpha Flag Code:
    JV
    Capture date: May 29, 2017
    Sex: Female
    Location: Saratoga, WY
    Namesake: We’ll give JV a real name soon. For now her “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag she wears.

    This paparazzi of volunteers treated this female curlew, JV, like a glamorous movie star! And rightfully so, as she was an absolute beauty. Often times, we are extremely lucky to have help from local ranchers and landowners on trap days- it brings a great energy and sense of community when community members can join in and be an integral part of our efforts for curlew conservation!

    a large group watches and photographs a curlew

    A team of landowners and partners learn about curlews in a meaningful hands-on way as they watch Jay prepare to release JV

  • JL

    Alpha Flag Code:
    JL
    Capture date: May 29, 2018
    Sex: Male
    Location: Saratoga, WY

    Namesake: We’ll give JL a real name soon. For now his “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag he wears.

    a biologist holds a long billed curlew

    JL overlooks his territory in Saratoga Wyoming before returning to guard his nest. While we gave him a transmitter, his well-camouflaged mate took over incubation duties.

    Ever wonder why Long-billed curlews are so camouflaged like JL? Well, ground- nesting species use this incredible adaptation to protect themselves as well as their eggs and chicks from hungry predators. If a predator like a coyote comes trotting by, the curlew sinks lower and lower into the ground-what we call “sitting tight” to the nest- until blending completely into their surroundings. However, if a curlew happens to get caught off guard, the coyote will see it, and discover the snack size eggs. Often times the coyote will not eat all the eggs at once, but instead will dig a hole and “cache” (store) them for a later meal!

  • HP

    Alpha Flag Code:
    HP
    Capture date:  May, 29, 2017
    Sex: Female
    Location: Saratoga, WY

    Namesake: We’ll give HP a real name soon. For now her “name” is the two letter code that’s engraved on the green leg flag she wears.

    Research biologist Stephanie Coates, the BSU graduate student that studied Long-billed curlews for her Master’s Thesis, spotted this female on her nest through a spotting scope at 1200 meters away- that is over ½ a mile! This created quite a challenge for those who needed to carry the mist net out to try to trap this curlew. With precision coordination assistance from ranchers/landowners, the team was successful in guiding biologists through patches of standing water from flood irrigation and plenty of mosquitos (all with aching arms) right to the nest. WAY TO GO TEAM!!

    a grandfather and grandson hold a long billed curlew and release it

    George Williamson and his grandson release HP back to her nest. Photo by Jay Carlisle

  • KH

    Alpha Flag Code:
    KH
    Capture date: May 3, 2017
    Sex: Male
    Location: 20 Mile South Farm, Boise, ID

    Namesake: While monitoring his nest, the Curlew Crew gave this fellow the temporary nickname “Alf” because his nest was found in an alfalfa field!

    KH is a handsome male that we trapped “down on the farm”- the 20 Mile South Farm to be exact!  The City of Boise owns and operates this 4225-acre farm approximately 20 miles south of Boise. We started studying in this agricultural habitat in 2017 and it is providing a deeper understanding of nesting requirements of the Long-billed Curlew. We now know that they will nest in a variety of crops such as corn and wheat. This guy chose an alfalfa field- hence his  temporary name of “ALF”!

    Jay checks the eggs at Alf’s nest to determine their hatch date. Curlews rely so much on camouflage that they sometimes choose not to leave while we check their nest! Photo by Stephanie Coates

  • Curly Fry

    Alpha Flag Code:
    AT
    Capture date: May 1, 2017
    Sex: Female
    Location: 20 Mile South Farm, Boise,ID
    Namesake: Curly Fry was named by the Boise WaterShed Environmental Education Center. We worked with the watershed folks to name Curly Fry because the biosolids from the watershed treatment center are taken to Curly’s home, the 20 Mile South Farm, for processing!

    Here’s what Mary Lugg from the WaterShed Center says (condensed) about Curly Fry

    This name combines the common name of the Long-billed Curlew and the delicious dish we all know and love. The name was chosen because Idaho is crazy about potatoes! What’s not to love about the potato? You can eat them in many different dishes including the curly fry!

    But we love this little Curly Fry for another special reason- her transmitter will allow us to learn more about the migration patterns and population needs of the Long-billed Curlew!

    a long billed curlew being held by a person, and with a small transmitter on its back.

    Curly Fry waits patiently for her transmitter to be attached. Photo by Heather Hayes

    curly fry the long billed curlew about to be released. held in hands

    Curly Fry prepares for takeoff! Photo by Ben Nydegger



Deceased


  • shothenry
    hy
  • Ada

    Deceased: Eaten by a predator, July 2013
    Alpha Flag Code:
    AM
    Capture date: 5-9-13
    Sex: Female
    Location: The Long-billed Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) between Middleton and Emmett Idaho.

    Namesake: Ada County, Idaho, near her summer home on the ACEC. Ada’s name was chosen by IBO’s IBO Boise State Facebook fans.

    Ada is the 3rd Curlew captured for our study. She and her mate, Emmett, successfully hatched 4 chicks on June 5th, 2013! Ada became famous when a crew from the Idaho Statesman came out to watch her receive a transmitter! Read Idaho Statesman story about Ada. Ada was killed and eaten while on her wintering grounds in California, most likely by a Prairie Falcon. Read story about Ada loss.

    Photo by Darin Oswald, Idaho Statesman

    Ada, held by Jessica just before being released. Photo by Darin Oswald, Idaho Statesman

  • Emmett

    Deceased: Shot illegally in 2016
    Alpha Flag Code:
    AE
    Capture date:6-4-13
    Sex: Male
    Location: The Long-billed Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) between Middleton and Emmett Idaho.

    Namesake: The town of Emmett, Idaho, near his summer home on the ACEC. Emmett’s name was chosen by IBO’s IBO Curlew Crew Facebook fans.

    Our new male, Emmett, who received CA's old transmitter. Photo by Rob Miller

    Our male, Emmett, who received CA’s old transmitter. Photo by Rob Miller

    Emmett was the 5th Curlew captured for our study, and was tracked for the longest amount of time. We followed him for over 6 migrations.

    Emmett’s obituary in The Messenger Index newspaper

    He and his mate, Ada had 4 chicks hatch on June 5th, 2013. Emmett was tagged as a replacement after ‘Carl’ died and we were able to recover the transmitter. After migrating to California, Emmett returned to the ACEC in 2014 but did not breed. Emmett spent the winter of 14-15 in California once again, and was the first of our transmittered birds to return to the ACEC in 2015. He spent the summer of 2016 on a territory next to his neighbors Frank and Bethine. Although he did not have a mate or chicks of his own that summer, we frequently observed him mobbing predators and teaming up with a nearby pair to protect their chicks. He was likely shot while dive-bombing a person who was too close to the other curlew family.

    Emmett, our longest-tracked curlew, was shot illegally while trying to protect chicks. Photo by Heather Hayes

  • Venus

    Deceased: Shot illegally late May 2014
    Alpha Flag Code:
    AK
    Capture date: 5-5-14
    Sex: Female
    Location: The Long-billed Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) between Middleton and Emmett Idaho.

    Namesake: We asked the Community Cub Scout Pack (#255) of Middleton to help us give her a name. The pack voted and came up with the name “Venus”. We were surprised by their choice at first, but since Venus can mean “bright queen of the sky” we think the name is pretty fitting for a migratory bird like a curlew! VenusVenus was illegally shot in late May of 2014, soon after her chicks hatched. Read more about her story in our blog post “Silver Lining

  • “Carl”

    Deceased: Shot illegally in late May 2013
    Alpha Flag Code:
    CA
    Capture date:5-6-13
    Sex: Male
    Location: The Long-billed Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) between Middleton and Emmett Idaho.

    Namesake: Carl died before we could give him a real name, however the crew gave him the nickname “Carl” to match his alpha flag code, “CA”.

    After Memorial Day weekend, Jay became suspicious that something might be wrong with one of our transmitters since it was not transmitting/displaying normally. On June 2nd a team led by Liz went out and was able to recover the transmitter but our fears were confirmed – unfortunately, we found that he was dead. Because of the delay in finding his remains, we did not find an intact body, and cannot determine how he died.

    Based on our experience in recent years, our biggest cause for concern with this project was that a transmittered bird would be shot. After all, we see people out shooting – mostly ground squirrels or targets – every day at the study site and the day we trapped this male there was a recently-killed Swainson’s Hawk 150m from the curlew nest. And, we have certain evidence of curlews being shot and killed in 3 of the past 4 seasons (dead curlews with obvious bullet wounds) and we suspect it happens more than we are aware of. On her most recent visit to check the status of the birds over the Memorial Day weekend, Liz had seen numerous people shooting within 150m of where the pair was nesting and had recently hatched their chicks.

    Curlews become very vocal and defensive, thus easily visible, when they are trying to protect their chicks. We certainly cannot say that CA was shot, but whether shooting was at issue in this particular case, it remains a real risk for these curlews. Read the full blog post here.

    Proud dad 'Carl', on the day his chicks hatched. The last photo taken of him before he died. Photo by Liz Urban.

    Proud dad ‘Carl’, on the day his chicks hatched. The last photo taken of him before he died.
    Photo by Liz Urban.

  • Curley

    Deceased: Unknown cause, September 2013
    Alpha Flag Code:
    AX
    Capture date: 5-7-13
    Sex: Female
    Location: The Long-billed Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) between Middleton and Emmett Idaho.

    Namesake: Curley’s transmitter was graciously funded by the McDanel Land Foundation. Because of this, the donor got the opportunity to name her. She is named after a family member who is a bird-lover and who’s nickname is, coincidentally, “Curley”! Also, because these donors are excited about the Curlew Classroom project, and they think Curley is a name that a second grader would choose. They hope it reminds the children of the name of the bird.

    Curley is the 2nd Curlew tagged for this study. We admired her for her spunky attitude, because while we were tagging her she was the only bird that actually tried to bite Fletcher! She hatched a nest with her mate, ‘Carl’, but unfortunately after Carl was shot the chicks did not survive. Curley was a fighter though, and was able to survive and move to a safer location on the ACEC after losing her mate and chicks.

    Curley died in late September on her wintering grounds in California from unknown causes.

    Curley defending her chicks on the day they hatched. Photo by Liz Urban

    Curley defending her chicks on the day they hatched. Photo by Liz Urban


  • Shotgun

    Deceased: Peregrine Falcon depredation in June 2016
    Alpha Flag Code:
    shotEA
    Capture date: 5-29-15
    Sex: Female
    Location: Shotgun Valley, Idaho
    Namesake:  We nicknamed this bird Shotgun because she bred in the Shotgun Valley in Idaho.

    Shotgun was caught by a nesting Peregrine Falcon during her southward migration in 2015. She was most likely fed to the two hungry Peregrine chicks! Read more about the recovery of her transmitter in our blog post: What Happens in Vegas…

    Idaho Fish and Game biologist Rob Cavallaro gets ready to release 'Shotgun'

    Idaho Fish and Game biologist Rob Cavallaro gets ready to release ‘Shotgun’

  • Jay Jr.

    Deceased: Died during southbound migration 2016

    Alpha Flag Code:
    jayJC
    Capture date: 6-3-15
    Sex: Male
    Location: Daniel, Wyoming
    Namesake: Because his leg flag code, JC, matches the initials of Jay Carlisle (IBO research director and curlew project lead), we couldn’t help naming him after Jay!

    Jay with JC

    Jay holds “Jay Jr.” in beautiful Daniel, Wyoming

  • Henry

    Deceased: Road Killed in July 2015
    Alpha Flag Code:
    henryCV
    Capture date: 5-28-15
    Sex: Male
    Location: The Nature Conservancy’s Flat Ranch Preserve near Island Park, ID
    Namesake: Henry bred near Henry’s Lake in eastern Idaho.

    Henry was Henrietta’s mate in 2015. We believe he was hit by a car on the busy highway that runs along the Flat Ranch Preserve.

    Read more about the recovery of his transmitter in our blog post: What Happens in Vegas…

    TNC Biologist Matthew Ward and son release Henry. Photo by Erica Gaeta

    TNC Biologist Matthew Ward and son release Henry.
    Photo by Erica Gaeta

  • HY

    Deceased: Unknown cause, Winter 2015-2016
    Alpha Flag Code:
    HYtag
    Capture date: 5-31-15
    Sex: Female
    Location: Grand Teton National Park
    Namesake: We didn’t get a chance to name HY before she died.

    Mary releases HY in Grand Teton

    Mary releases HY in Grand Teton. Mary Lohuis of Jackson is a key volunteer on many local wildlife projects and integral part of the Meg & Bert Raynes Wildlife Fund that helps support the curlew project.

    HY bred in the beautiful Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. She spent her winter near the Colorado River Delta where the river runs into the Gulf of California. Her transmitter showed strange movement patterns in early 2016 and we later lost track of her. It appears that she may have died and her transmitter floated out to sea for a while before sinking to the bottom.

    HY's transmitter floated out to sea before disappearing

    HY’s transmitter floated out to sea before disappearing

  • Mr. and Mrs. Dave

    Deceased: possibly depredation? Fall 2016 and Spring 2017

    Alpha Flag Code:
    CJ 
    Capture dates– Dave: 5-12-14, Carol: May 2016
    Sex: Mated Pair
    Location: Dave spent 2014 and 2015 on MPG Ranch near Florence, MT. In 2016 Dave relocated to Dillon, MT and met Mr. Carol!

    Namesakes: While spending a few frustrating days searching for nests at MPG Ranch, Jay and Heidi became familiar with a certain curlew who always seemed to spend time near a gravel parking area on the ranch. For a while we simply called it “parking lot” but later decided to give it a name. Judging by bill size we assumed it was a male, and so we called it “Parking Lot Dave”. A few days later we found a nest nearby and were able to trap the female. She had the shortest bill we had seen on any of the females on the ranch. We released her and continued to search for more nests in the area. Later that day, we were surprised when “Dave” showed up in his regular spot, but this time wearing a transmitter! Dave was a girl! We thought about changing her name, but somehow “Dave” stuck.

    Jay and Dave have a moment while testing the fit of her transmitter. By refusing to walk in the tent, she's telling us it doesn't fit right. Photo by William Blake

    Jay and Dave have a moment while testing the fit of her transmitter. By refusing to walk in the tent, she’s telling us it doesn’t fit right. Photo by William Blake

    Dave nested on MPG Ranch near Florence, MT during the 2014 and 2015 nesting seasons. We tried trapping her mate both years but her nest failed in 2014 and hatched in 2015 before we could trap him (we can only trap curlews when they are sitting tight on a nest).

    In 2016 Dave did something we’ve never seen any other curlew do. She migrated north to MPG Ranch as usual, spent only a few days, and then turned around and flew south! We think she may have returned and not found her mate there. So, she headed for a ranch near Dillon, MT, which she had visited during fall migration in 2015. Apparently while using it as a stopover site she realized that it could be a good location to breed!

    In May Jay traveled to the ranch and found Dave nesting with a new male. We were able to trap him and give him a transmitter. While scouting out the nest location, the ranching family suggested to Jay that since Dave had a boy’s name, maybe we should give her mate a girls name. Off the top of her head, she suggested “why don’t we name him Carol or something?”. Jay laughed….our long-time volunteers and friends, the Wikes, are named Dave and Carol! After that, there was no doubt that we had to name him Carol. So, there we have it: a girl named Dave and a boy named Carol :)

    Migration is risky business and is not always successful. Unfortunately, our curlews Dave and Carol never completed their migratory journeys. In 2016, Dave left her nesting area in Montana and was heading towards her wintering grounds when we noticed her “dot” stopped moving on the satellite tracking map on a treacherous stretch of the eastern rim of the Grand Canyon where it still rests today. Because of the dangerous location, Dave’s transmitter is unrecoverable, therefore her cause of death remains a mystery. (A few of our other curlews that turned up dead on cliff edges were eaten by Peregrine Falcons).

    Dave’s transmitter is stranded in the Grand Canyon east of Lake Mead, near the famous SkyWalk

    Carol, perished during his migration to his MT breeding grounds in the spring of 2017 in a wilderness area just outside of Cedar City, Utah. While checking the satellite tracking map, we noticed no movement of Carol’s “dot”. The Curlew Crew was able to recover the transmitter months later, and evidence suggested Carol had presumably been killed by a falcon but we couldn’t say for sure.

    Carol’s body was found in an extremely hilly region near Cedar City

  • Valkyrie

    Deceased: possible falcon depredation, Spring 2018

    Alpha Flag Codes:
    valk
    Capture dates: 5-5-15
    Sex: Female
    Location: The Long-billed Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) between Middleton and Emmett Idaho.
    Namesake: Thor and Valkyrie got their names from Middleton High School Students, after the biology classes held a naming contest. The names Thor and Valkyrie were chosen since the Middleton High School mascot is the Viking. In Norse mythology Valkyrie is an angel.

    Valkyrie had one of the longest bills in our SW Idaho curlew population! Photo by Heidi W

    Read about Thor and Valkyrie in this blog post: The curlew of thunder, spit swabs, and bendy beaks

    Thor and Valkyrie were proud parents in 2015. Here's a shot of their newly hatched chick and pipping eggs! Photo by Stephanie Coates

    Thor and Valkyrie were proud parents in 2015. Here’s a shot of their newly hatched chick and pipping eggs! Photo by Stephanie Coates

    Like a front page tabloid story, our famous curlew couple Valkyrie and her mate, Thor, went through a shocking “curlew break-up” in 2017 and they never met up to mate on the ACEC (Area of Critical Environmental Concern) . Typically, Long-billed curlews mate for life until one of the mates dies, so this was a new piece to the curlew puzzle!  We caught up with Thor by the end of the 2017 breeding season and saw him walking with a new “girlfriend”.

    We never did catch up with Valkyrie on the ACEC, but did see on the satellite tracking map that she migrated on time towards the Central Valley of California. Unfortunately, Valkyrie was killed by what we assume to be a predator on the wintering grounds in the beginning of 2018. When her dot stopped moving on the tracking map we asked our colleagues at the California Department of Fish and Wildlife for help recovering the transmitter. Biologists headed out to locate the transmitter with specialized tracking equipment and found her transmitter lying in a field on the Carrizo Plain in California with nothing left of her except a few feathers. Aerial predators like Prairie Falcons seem to be a common cause of natural death in our curlew population.  

    Valkyrie’s transmitter was recovered by our partner biologists in California. She was found on the Carrizo Plain. Photo by Abigail Gwinn

  • Syringa & KJ

    Deceased: Mated pair shot illegally during May 2017

    Alpha Flag Codes:
    JK KJ
    Capture date: 5-7-16 and 5-2-17
    Sex: mated pair
    Location: Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Combat Training Center, south of the Boise Airport
    Namesake: Syringa was the top name choice for a female curlew in a naming contest held among Idaho schoolchildren. Mrs. Wilson’s 4th grade class at Adam’s Elementary chose this beautiful name because it is the state flower of Idaho!  Unfortunately, KJ was shot before he received a name.

    KJ became famous when we filmed his capture live and shared it on The Curlew Crew facebook page. You can watch the video of him receiving his transmitter at this link.

    Syringa waits patiently with a bandana over her head as Jay attaches her transmitter

    Syringa waits patiently with a bandana over her head as Jay attaches her transmitter

    We are extremely saddened to report that our female curlew, Syringa, who was named after Idaho’s state flower by 4th graders at Adams Elementary, and her unnamed mate, KJ, were found dead on their breeding grounds on the Orchard Combat Training Center in 2017. The carcasses of this mated pair had been found just weeks apart in the same general area. This event likely lead to the death of their newly hatched chicks that were left unprotected. Necropsy results confirmed that both curlews had been shot.

    Both KJ (L) and Syringa (R) were found shot within weeks of each other. Their young chicks were too young to care for themselves at the time of their parents’ deaths. Photos by Mikie McDonnell

    This is a perfect example of “exponential loss”. The loss of a mated pair doesn’t lead to just 2 deaths, it can be up to 6 when including the chicks left behind. Then, when you add in the potential future progeny (future chicks) that all 6 of these now deceased curlews could have had, the number grows even more exponentially. When you start to understand this alarming rate of loss, it is easy to see how quickly a species like the Long-billed curlew can reach a 95% in just under 40 years. These birds are on Idaho’s “Species of Greatest Conservation Need” and cannot afford the continued decline to their population.

    These individuals lived in an area where open shooting is allowed. Many law-abiding citizens visit these areas for target practice or ground squirrel hunting. Unfortunately, not everyone obeys the law. Although shooting of curlews (and other protected bird species) is illegal, we continue to see this happen in these desert areas with lots of human activity. We’re working with Idaho Bird Conservation Partnership, shooter groups, and partners like the Idaho Varmint Hunters, Inc. to help spread the word.

    Please help us stop the rapid decline of the Long-billed curlew and SHARE this info. Curlews are a protected species! If a curlew starts dive-bombing you, it likely has chicks and is only trying to protect its family. The solution to avoiding curlew mobbing is simple: move away a few hundred yards. You can be fined up to $1,000 for shooting a curlew or any other protected birds.

    Syringa poses for her profile photo

    Syringa poses for her profile photo

    Curlew Crew Biologist Ben Wright holds KJ on the Orchard Combat Training Center near Pleasant Valley Road

  • Athena

    Deceased: Shot illegally in May 2017

    Alpha Flag Code:
    HH
    Capture date: 5-7-16
    Sex: Female
    Location: Idaho Army National Guard Orchard Combat Training Center, south of the Boise Airport
    Namesake: Athena and her mate Zeus are named after Greek gods! Their names were entered into our Curlews in the Classroom naming contest by Middleton Middle School’s 7th grade science class, and won 40% of the final vote in our IBO Curlew Crew Facebook naming contest.

    Heather Hayes with HH

    Athena shares her initials with curlew crew member and Outreach Coordinator, Heather Hayes!

    UPDATE:

    After tracking her in 2016, Athena’s “dot” stopped moving on the satellite tracking map in 2017- so we knew she might be in trouble, but her transmitter shut off and we weren’t able to locate her. Suddenly, later in the year the transmitter started signaling again. We took our transmitter locating equipment out and found her skeletal remains on the National Guard lands- the OCTC (Orchard Combat Training Center). By examining her skeletal remains we found undeniable evidence that she’d been killed with a shotgun, including holes in her breastbone and shot still embedded in her spine. Though extremely saddened that yet another curlew was needlessly shot, we gained valuable information for our study. We not only have proof that recreational shooting continues to be a problem for curlew populations, we also get to reuse that transmitter on another curlew the next season!

    Athena’s skeleton was found with holes from shotgun pellets (visible here) in her breastbone. Photo by Ben Wright



Retired

  • Henrietta

    Retired: Transmitter removed June 3, 2017!

    Alpha Flag Code:
    AH
    Capture date: 5-28-14
    Sex: Female
    Location: The Nature Conservancy’s Flat Ranch Preserve near Island Park, ID

    Namesake: After a public vote on The Nature Conservancy’s website, she was named Henrietta after Henry’s Lake, which is near her home on the Flat Ranch. Read more about Flat Ranch and the curlews that live there on TNC’s website!

    We placed a transmitter on her mate, Henry, in 2015, and her mate JA, aka “King Henry II” in 2016.

    AH

    Jay with Henrietta in 2014, the day she first got her transmitter!

    Along with being our first curlew tracked from anywhere in Eastern Idaho, Henrietta’s other claim to fame was as a movie star! In 2016 the Wide Eye Productions crew were filming Idaho The Movie II and visited Flat Ranch to learn about Henrietta and curlew conservation!

    We got to say hello to this special curlew again on the morning of June 3, 2017. Henrietta had been wearing her transmitter for three years and gave us lots of great data.

    It was a bittersweet reunion to trap her once more to remove her transmitter. These transmitters have a life of about three years, then need to be refurbished.  Henrietta’s transmitter was refurbished with a new battery, re-sealed, then shipped back to redeploy on a new lucky curlew!

    Thank you for being an amazing ambassador for your species, Henrietta, enjoy your retirement :)

    Henrietta takes off into retirement with no transmitter on her back!

  • Borah

    Retired: Transmitter fell off June 2014
    Alpha Flag Code:
    AU
    Capture date:5-25-13
    Sex: Male
    Location: The Page Family’s Big Creek Ranch, near the town of May, ID. Pahsimeroi Valley.

    Namesake: Mount Borah, the highest mountain in Idaho (12,668ft). Borah’s home, on the Goldburg Parcel of the Big Creek Ranch, is in the shadows of Mt. Borah and the rest of the Lost River Mountain Range. Borah’s transmitter was graciously funded by the Page Family Foundation. Borah is the 4th bird captured for our study. He is the only one of our Curlews that does not live in the ACEC. He gives us a great opportunity to compare the behavior of our birds in the Treasure Valley, since he lives in a very undisturbed, high-quality area.

    Fun fact: We chose the tag “AU” for Borah, because AU is the atomic symbol for Gold, and he lives on the Goldburg Parcel of the ranch. Over the winter of 2013-2014 Borah headed south to Mexico and spend time at the mouth of the Colorado River before moving north in to California’s central valley.

    In 2014 Borah gave us a scare when his transmitter showed he wasn’t moving. After thinking he was dead, we were relieved to discover that the strap on his transmitter had worn through and fallen off. We are happy to have one still very alive curlew, though we wish we could track his movements on another migration!

    Borah, just before release, with his namesake Mt. Borah in the background. Photo by Heidi Ware

    Borah, just before release, with his namesake Mt. Borah in the background. Photo by Heidi Ware



Previously Tracked (no longer transmitting)

  • mill

  • Gem

    Missing: last transmitted on December 14, 2015
    Alpha Flag Code:
    cp
    Capture Date: 5-1-15
    Sex: female
    Location: The Long-billed Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) between Middleton and Emmett Idaho.
    Namesake: Gem is named after Gem County, Idaho by students from Emmett High School.

    Gem shows off her wingspan while receiving her transmitter backpack. Photo by Heather Hayes

    Gem shows off her wingspan while receiving her transmitter backpack. Photo by Heather Hayes

  • Goldie

    Not Transmitting: last transmission December 2017

    Alpha Flag Code:
    AN
    Capture date: 5-24-14
    Sex: Female
    Location: The Page Family’s Big Creek Ranch, near the town of May, ID. Pahsimeroi Valley.

    Namesake: Since the Page family funded this transmitter (Thank You Pages!) we asked them to choose her name. They decided to name her Goldie after the Goldburg parcel of the ranch where she lives.

    Goldie is the mate of Borah, one of the curlews tagged in 2013. When we returned to Big Creek in 2014 to attach another transmitter we were hoping to capture a female, but didn’t plan to catch Borah’s mate. We lucked out in that we found not only had Borah returned to Big Creek, but his nest was easily accessible! We were able to catch Goldie on their nest, and are excited to see if her migration and wintering behavior will be similar to Borah’s.

    Molly Page releasing Goldie

    Molly Page releasing Goldie

    Because her transmitter was old, we attempted to catch Goldie in summer 2017 to remove and refurbish her transmitter. But 2017’s unprecedented snow levels caused extreme flooding in the pastures of the Pahsimeroi valley, and Goldie did not successfully breed. Since we can only trap curlews while they are sitting on their nests, Goldie was able to elude us. Goldie’s transmitter stopped sending signals during late winter 2017. The transmitters our curlews wear have an estimated life of 3 years before they stop working, so it’s difficult to say whether something happened to her or whether her transmitter simply shut off.

  • Byron

    Malfunctioning transmitter: last transmitted on June 2, 2014
    Alpha Flag Code:
    AP
    Capture date: 5-14-14
    Sex: Male
    Location: MPG Ranch near Florence, MT

    Namesake: Byron is named in memory of Byron Weber. Bitterroot Audubon has a memorial scholarship in memory of this teacher, naturalist, leader and conservationist. Contribute to the scholarship/education fund here. “Byron is remembered for his passion for living things. This passion fueled his entire life. He made learning about our natural environment accessible and meaningful. Encouraging all ages to explore, respect and preserve the splendid natural world around us was how Byron lived and worked.”

    Byron is mated to Florence, one of the female curlews we transmittered at MPG ranch. They successfully hatched chicks in May 2014! He also holds the record for the shortest bill of any Montana curlew we’ve caught! (less than 10 centimeters)

    AP

    Hannah from Intermountain West Joint Venture holds Byron just before releasing him.

  • Florence

    Malfunctioning transmitter: last transmitted on June 28, 2014
    Alpha Flag Code:
    AL
    Capture date: 5-13-14
    Sex: Female
    Location: MPG Ranch near Florence, MT

    Namesake: Florence is named after the town of Florence, MT which is the nearest town to her home at MPG Ranch. Florence is the mate of Byron, one of the other MPG Ranch Curlews. They successfully hatched chicks during the 2014 season! AL


  • Atticus

    Malfunctioning transmitter: last transmitted on July 27, 2014
    Alpha Flag Code:
    AC
    Capture date: 5-29-14
    Sex: Male Location: MPG Ranch near Florence, MT

    Namesake: Atticus is named after Atticus Finch from the famous novel To Kill a Mockingbird. After reading his story, you’ll understand why it is fitting to name this curlew after a famous and heroic single father. Atticus

  • Millie

    Not Transmitting: last transmission Feb 2017

    Alpha Flag Code:
    millCT
    Capture date: 5-15-15
    Sex: Female
    Location: The Page Family’s Big Creek Ranch, near the town of May, ID. Pahsimeroi Valley.
    Namesake: Since the Page family funded this transmitter (Thank You Pages!) we asked them to choose her name. They decided to name her Millie because she lives near Mill Creek on the ranch.

    Millie on the beautiful Big Creek Ranch

  • Bethine

    Alpha Flag Codes:
    CC
    Capture dates: 4-30-14
    Sex: Female
    Location: The Long-billed Curlew Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) between Middleton and Emmett Idaho.
    Namesake: Bethine was named after Bethine Church. The Church’s are a famous couple in Idaho, known for their work in conservation of Idaho’s wild places. In fact, one of the largest wilderness areas in the lower 48 shares their name: The Frank Church river of no return wilderness.

    Bethine patiently waiting while her transmitter is attached.

    Bethine patiently waiting while her transmitter is attached. Photo by Bryce Robinson

    You can read more about Frank and Bethine on Stephanie Coates’ Curlew Crew blog here.

     

    After 3 successful years returning to her breeding grounds on the ACEC (Area of Critical Environmental Concern) to meet up with her mate Frank, we noticed something fishy upon her arrival in the spring of 2017…she was not with Frank! She spent the first few weeks on private property and then we noticed on the satellite tracking  map that her “dot” stopped moving in the middle a farm field on the border of the ACEC. By the time we got to the location of where her satellite transmitter sent its last signal, the field had already been tilled. We will never know what happened to her, but we do know for sure that without her help, we would have never gained the wealth of valuable migratory information that she provided to this study- thank you Bethine!